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Dr Lars Petersson

Team Leader and Principal Research Scientist

https://people.csiro.au/P/L/Lars-Petersson

Biography

Dr Lars Petersson is a Principal Research Scientist within the Imaging and Computer Vision Group , Data61, CSIRO, Australia. There, he is leading a team of 10+ staff of researchers and engineers developing computer vision technologies useful in real world commercial applications while also pushing the boundaries of state-of-the-art research via publications in top-tier venues. The team is also supervising 15+ Computer Vision PhD students in areas such as action recognition, real-time instance segmentation, human pose estimation etc. He is also co-leading one of the activities under CSIRO’s Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence Future Science Platform effort where with a team of 10 postdocs and about 40 researchers from 6 Business Units, data science problems from the smallest of microscopy scales to the largest of astronomical scales are addressed by developing new and novel MLAI technologies. Previous to joining Data61/CSIRO, he was a Principal Researcher and Research Leader in NICTA’s computer vision research group where, from 2003 until 2016, he was leading projects such as Smart Cars, AutoMap, and Distributed Large Scale Vision. Before joining NICTA, he did one year of postdoctoral research at the Australian National University. He received his PhD in March 2002 from KTH, Stockholm, Sweden, where he also received his Master’s degree in Engineering Physics.

Other Interests

Lars has a keen interest in finding the boundaries of what is possible and then attempt to go beyond. Finding connections between different fields of study and seemingly unrelated domains. In his leadership role of the Object Detection Activity in the MLAI FSP in CSIRO, he has the opportunity to exercise this interest together with excellent domain researchers in these Business Units:

Academic Qualifications

  • 2002

    PhD in Robotics and Computer Vision
    KTH

  • 1996

    Master in Engineering Physics
    KTH