Dr Ashlin Lee


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Biography

Dr Ashlin Lee has a background in Digital Sociology, with an interest in the following topics:

  • The intersection of society, data, and technology and the implementation of these intersections in everyday life

  • The role of data and digital systems in everyday life, particularly from the perspective of users

  • Individual experiences of surveillance, particularly digitally mediated surveillance systems

  • The emergence of data driven systems (artificial intelligence, algorithms, automation), and their impacts and significance on society.

He has applied these skills in a number of different positions, in both academic and public sector contexts. As an academic, has has been an Associate Lecturer in Sociology at the University of Tasmania, and is currently an Honorary Lecturer in Sociology at the Australian National University.

Before joining the CSIRO, he was a member of the Australian Public Service, and worked as a Performance Auditor for the Australian National Audit Office (Defence Branch), and as a User Research with the Chief Technology Officer Branch of the Digital Transformation Agency.

At the CSIRO, Ashlin acts as Social Architect, providing sociological and social science insights to assist in the development, deployment, and optimisation of information and data systems. He also continues to pursue sociological research into the role of data in society, and related socio-technical/digital issues.

Current Roles

  • Social Architecture
    Data Governance Project

Academic Qualifications

  • 2016

    PhD (Sociology)
    University of Tasmania

  • 2011

    Bachelors of Arts (First Class Honours - Sociology)
    University of Tasmania

Professional Experiences

  • 2018-Present

    Lecturer in Sociology
    The Australian National University

  • 2018-2018

    User Researcher
    Digital Transformation Agency

  • 2017-2018

    Performance Auditor
    Australian National Audit Office

  • 2014-2016

    Associate Lecturer (Sociology)
    University of Tasmania